Archive for the ‘canine distemper’ Category

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NEUROLOGIC DISTEMPER all forms
(ODE – Old Dog Encephalitis.)

This medical protocol covers neurologic forms of distemper which include chorea, seizures, progressive paralysis, blindness. This medical protocol pertains to dogs of all ages who ARE infected with the neurologic forms of distemper. Presence of antidistemper antibodies in the CSF is totally diagnostic of this problem. The neurological symptoms may appear in some dogs as soon as two weeks and in others as long as eight years after infection. In the past, any of these symptoms as noted above resulted in progressive and imminent death.

A new treatment has been developed that has been totally successful in two dogs with all the above symptoms : Both dogs have been positively diagnosed with antidistemper antibodies in the CSF by Antech labs in Calif.

As of Aug 6, 2008, two dogs are alive with minimal signs of the distemper neurologic secondary form. One with seizures the other with blindness and paralysis. Both are alive and doing well 10 months after initial treatment {Photos of these dogs are available and copies or the original lab work confirming neurologic distemper are available.

So far these two dogs have remained symptom free for 10 months. This treatment does not replace lost neural tracts. Neural recovery takes place as new tracts are formed in the brain. I have only used this on two dogs to date. Any further use of this procedure is purely experimental. This medical protocol will be updated and or revised as more information becomes available.

UPDATE JUNE 2009: Several more successful cases have been reported from Texas, Georgia, Florida and California.

Newcastle’s Disease Virus (NDV) is the inducer that will eliminate intracellular distemper virus in the brain, also eliminate the immune disorder causing neurologic damage in the canine. ( C-4 cell damage) I have used the La Sorta strain only because it has been available. 1000 dose bottles with 6 cc of dilutent is your inducer. This material can be purchased at any agricultural store that deals with poultry.

Medical procedure protocol for spinal tap treatment

1. Place an IV catheter.

2. Anesthetize the dog as for surgery.

3. Prep for surgery at the foramen magnum.

4. Spinal tap at the Foramen Magnum.

5. Remove 0.1 cc to 1.0 cc of spinal fluid based on the size of the dog.

6. Send the spinal fluid to a lab for testing for anti-distemper antibodies. Antech Labs.

7. Inject using the same placed needle from 0.1 to 0.5 cc of NDV depending on size of the dog directly into the spinal canal and flush the needle with ½ to 1 cc of saline.

8. Treat the dog for shock with fluids after giving this injection.

[Note: A video on how to perform this procedure is available at http://kindheartsinaction.com/2009/12/17/dr-sears-describes-a-spinal-tap/]

Send saved spinal fluid to Lab for Anti-Distemper Antibodies in the CSF. Any distemper antibody found is totally diagnostic for Neurologic Distemper.

Other tests to be deemed necessary by the attending veterinarian. Toxoplasmosis, immune cells, Infection, other causes of neuropathology, cancer.

NDV vaccine will initiate immune cytokines within the brain and spinal area. It will shut down the damaging immune response (active T-cells) as well as eliminate the offending Cerebral Intracellular Distemper virus within 24 hours.

Regenerative ability of the brain stem cells (Schwann cells or oligodendrocytes, and the replacement of myelin, stem cells) will allow for healing over a period of time and it will vary depending on the genetics of the dog and its ability to recover. Geron Labs may be able to accelerate this procedure.

Control of the seizure activity at this time can be controlled with Phenobarb, Na Bromide and other seizure medications until all symptoms come under control and disappear. The time involved here depends on the severity of the damage and the ability and genetics of the animal to recover. This can be a long-term recovery.

This procedure does not replace damaged neurons, nor does it make new myelin or Schwann cells. Geron Labs may improve on this. It does stop the progression of the disease and turns off the damaging active T-cells. It eliminates the offending intracellular distemper viruses. Allows for the survival of infected dogs and stops the immunological process from which untreated dogs will expire. Long-term recovery depends on the genetics of the dogs and the ability of the stem cell system to replace oligodendrocytes and develop new neural pathways and replace damaged myelin.

The basic ideas for these procedures were first promulgated by Dr. John Adams of UCLA in the early 70s. His thoughts were that the distemper and measles viruses were homologous and that the ODE an MS were homologous, if not identical. It would be hoped that just one interested person would read this and continue the above research into MS. May Dr. Adams, a giant in virology, rest in peace.

Life long immunity to distemper is conferred with infection from distemper virus.

Therefore repeat vaccination is equivocal. Live Parvo virus is NOT recommended. Combination vaccines are not recommended. Single killed virus vaccines are recommended after a period of time. Usually one year. If questions arise as to immunity have titers run for any virus.

NDV once given to any dog establishes NDV antibody for which there is no need. It precludes the use of NDV in any particular dog in the future as the antibody will neutralize this virus and prevent its activity on the immune system.

Test for neurologic distemper is a CSF antidistemper antibody test by a lab. Any antibody present is diagnostic. A second test just as specific is an MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Deficits of myelin can be identified and is probable distemper, definite deymyelination. A third involves the death of the animal. Pathology check of the brain will show intracellular virus. All three are diagnostic.

IgG corporeal distemper antibodies do not cross the blood brain barrier. So, if antibodies are present in the spinal fluid then you have neurologic distemper. Conversely if you have antibodies in the CSF and not in the blood serum and have had no symptoms of overt distemper then you have a rare form of distemper probably caused by vaccine.

If anybody has any questions please feel free to contact me. E-Mail – antidistemper@aol.com A.W.Sears , DVM

UPDATE, JUNE 6, 2009: These are notes from a vet in Texas who used this treatment. Vets using this procedure are using ultrasound to ensure the needle does not cause any damage. “As far as how to position the head – there are two ways that I have come across. One is with the spine at the edge of the table and the neck flexed with the bridge of the nose perpendicular to the spine – the nose has to be parallel to the table. The other way is similar but the neck is flexed as far as possible – that is what worked for Hunter. The idea is to open the cisterna magnum as much as possible to allow access to the spinal fluid. The landmarks are the same- the cranial edge of C2 and the occipital protuberance (the bone on top of their head, which I like to call the “knowledge bump”).

UPDATE, JAN. 11, 2010: Improvement from neuro distemper is not fast as in systemic infection.  It takes weeks.  You should be on some form of antiseizure medication if seizures are a problem.  Time is now your friend.  Must replace the oligodendrocytes destroyed by the virus and once this happens new myelin is produced and symptoms begin to disappear.  Takes time.  Doc Sears

UPDATE, APRIL 7, 2010: I talked to an old friend vet in Calif today who treated a case neurolgically and had pain.  He treated with Buprenorphine and said the dog was much more comfortable.  And did well.  I would suggest this as a post brain tap treatment to see if it helps with the pain.  Buprenophine  0.005 – 0.03 mg/kg  IV or IM or SQ .  2 to 4 times daily.   Also comes under the names of  Buprenex, Buprenor, or Tumgesic.   Vets have access to this drug.  Worth a try.

I’m hearing of a large group of dogs that are having problems with lock jaw after being treated intrathecally.  Do not know the cause.  But, most of these cases go on to die or be euthanized.  I think this needs to be put into the protocol as an exception.  I know of no way to help this situation at this time.  Doc

Additional information, endorsed by Dr. Sears: “Also use valium orally or rectally.  Between pain control and keeping them relaxed/sleeping for the first week, this helps them recover from the tap and seizures.  For a 4 lb dog, we used 0.7ml up to three times a day of liquid valium–per treating vets tried both the cherry kid’s oral and the IV valium in her rectum. I was given pre-filled syringes of buprenorpnine for a week–in a big jar, and several days of pre-filled syringes of valium plus a prescription was called into my local pharmacy.”

Treatment at presentation of acute upper respiratory disease

Tamiflu–Turns out some of these other viruses are extremely sensitive to this medication.  I would recommend that 1 mg/lb be given twice daily for at lease 7 days.  Should block most of the viruses we are discussing.

Antibiotics.–All these viruses cause inflammation in the lungs. (flu causes hemorrhagic pneumonia)  All leave a BACTERIAL SECONDARY PNEUMONIA.  My recommendation is Penicillin -G and Baytril inj three times daily in older dogs  9 Mos or older for at least 10 days.
Penicillin -G and Chloromycetin (25 mg/lb) three times daily for 10 days in younger dogs.  (Baytril causes joint problems in younger dogs)

Supportive fluids and feeding as necessary.

There is an effective test for these viruses developed and available through ANTECH.  This is a throat swab that distinguishes the upper respiratory viruses and give a good diagnosis.  Also for distemper there is still the transitional cell bladder test.  Works great to diagnose acute distemper quickly.

There is a test for distemper antigen an intranasal swab that is done at the clinical level.  Problem with this test is that it can and does go positive with vaccine distemper virus.  So, it can and does give false positive tests for distemper and cause a misdiagnosis.

Bordetella is kennel cough.  It is treated with cephalosporin antibiotics.  It does not routinely cause pneumonia.  Can be confused with the viral diseases.  I DO NOT LIKE THIS CLASS OF ANTIBIOTICS FOR PNEUMONIA IN VIRAL DISEASES.

List of upper respirartory  diseases that can and are confused with distemper
Parainfluenza
Adenovirus
Canine influenza H3N8
influenza H1N1
Mycoplasma
Corona virus
Herpes virus
Many bacterial pneumonias.

Treatment of secondary neurologic problems in dogs remains the same at this time.  This  problem is only seen in those dogs treated late in the disease or those that make a spontaneous recovery.

If you have any comments or recommendations please write to me and we can discuss them.  I came to realize that a lot of the pneumonias that are reported are NOT distemper.  Still need to be treated.

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Alson W. Sears DVM copyright 2010

(For more information, go to the Distemper donor dog blog.)

Note: Federal law prohibits the shipping of serum. However, a vet may make this serum in a clinic, store it there and treat dogs who are brought to that clinic.

1. The following protocol is for the production of anti-Distemper serum.
2. This serum is used S.Q. for the elimination of Distemper virus in acutely infected dogs.
3. Early treatment is recommended. Less than 4 days of illness.
4. Treat for bacterial pneumonia for at least seven days!
5. Recovery of acute Distemper Disease is usually within 12 to 48 hours.
6. This is species specific but, can be induced and used in any other species that are susceptible to distemper or related diseases.

Process for making the NDV-induced serum (anti-morbillivirus serum)

1. DOG: Use a 10- to 12-month-old, mixed-breed dog, 60-90 lbs, 27.27kg to 40.91kg, young and healthy.

2. Do full lab work-up to eliminate all possible health problems, especially blood-born diseases. If a dog has recently been dewormed, wait a couple of weeks after deworming so the immune modulators of the worms have a chance to disappear.

3. Must be previously vaccinated against all local diseases.

4. Do not use breeds or individuals known to have immune deficiency problems.

5. Make up Newcastle Disease Vaccine 1000 dose vial. (Use only the 6 cc of diluent vial that comes with the NDV or Saline if Diluent is not available). Inject 6.0cc of Diluent or Saline into the NDV vial. Discard the balance remaining from the Diluent vial. The La Sota strain or B-1 are most common. Other strains of this virus should work as well but do not use Killed Virus NDV Vaccine. Use Modified Live NDV. This virus is your cell immunity inducer.

6. Place IV Catheter in dog.

7. Inject 2.0 or 3.0cc of Newcastle virus I.V. from your vaccine bottle depending on the official weight of the dog. (Treat dog with I.V fluids accordingly) (Do Not use Corticosteroids)

8. Induction of Newcastle’s disease virus for cellular immune serum (cytokines) may only be done once on any dog. The second time around, antibodies to Newcastle’s disease are present. These are of no use and can cause an adverse reaction.

9. Timing is absolutely essential for taking serum against distemper. Take blood 11-12 hours post injection (11-12 hrs post injection= Anti-viral factors=Very effective against Distemper Virus in VIVO.) Timing is important. (Interferon, antiviral, regulatory, anti-inflammatory cytokines all have different times of production).

10. All procedures must be sterile. Just prior to the 11-12 hours post- injection, anesthetize donor dog (approx. 5-10 minutes before).

11. Place Jugular catheter.

12. Start I.V. fluids.

13. Withdraw blood between the 11th and 12th hour and inject into 10cc blood vials [sterile no additive vials] and allow the blood to clot. All VETS please take out only up to maximum amount from donor dog. Remove blood just short of putting the dog into shock. That can be determined by the color of the gums and respiratory rate. What is amazing is the speed with which a healthy dog recovers. Fluids of course help recovery. We could take about 250 cc whole blood from a 90 lb dog and get about 100 cc of usable serum (A.W. Sears DVM 6/8/09)

14. Centrifuge immediately after clotting for clear serum. Do not allow RBC’s to lyse.

15. Remove serum and place into sterile bottles.

16. Place serum bottles in baggies and store in refrigerator. Bottles of serum can be stored for up to five years in a refrigerator; longer if frozen.

17. Cryo-precipitates may form after refrigeration. Mixing causes clouding. This is not harmful.

18. May be filtered out with a .02 micron filter. Keep sterile.

19. All my donor dogs have survived. I have not lost any.

Note: Revisions may be made as new data becomes available.
If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Alson W. Sears DVM for further clarification at  AntiDistemper@aol.com.

Dosage

From Dr. Sears: Dose of the serum depends on age of the dog.  If for herpes, single shot 1 cc to each pup at birth.    If for distemper of any age the dose is 1 cc per dog plus 1 cc per 10 lbs 12 hours  apart for 3 treatments.   So, 20 lb dog would be 3 cc sub Q  12 hours apart 3 times. for a 30 lb dog would be 1 cc plus 3  cc for a total of 4 cc given 3 times. UPDATE: Give the injection sub Q on the rear legs–left or right–anterior to the great muscle, NOT between the shoulders or neck area.

Treatment at presentation of acute upper respiratory disease.

Tamiflu–Turns out some of these other viruses are extremely sensitive to this medication.  I would recommend that 1 mg/lb be given twice daily for at lease 7 days.  Should block most of the viruses we are discussing.

Antibiotics.–All these viruses cause inflammation in the lungs. (flu causes hemorrhagic pneumonia)  All leave a BACTERIAL SECONDARY PNEUMONIA.  My recommendation is Penicillin -G and Baytril inj three times daily in older dogs  9 Mos or older for at least 10 days.
Penicillin -G and Chloromycetin (25 mg/lb) three times daily for 10 days in younger dogs.  (Baytril causes joint problems in younger dogs)

Supportive fluids and feeding as necessary.

There is an effective test for these viruses developed and available through ANTECH.  This is a throat swab that distinguishes the upper respiratory viruses and give a good diagnosis.  Also for distemper there is still the transitional cell bladder test.  Works great to diagnose acute distemper quickly.

There is a test for distemper antigen an intranasal swab that is done at the clinical level.  Problem with this test is that it can and does go positive with vaccine distemper virus.  So, it can and does give false positive tests for distemper and cause a misdiagnosis.

Bordetella is kennel cough.  It is treated with cephalosporin antibiotics.  It does not routinely cause pneumonia.  Can be confused with the viral diseases.  I DO NOT LIKE THIS CLASS OF ANTIBIOTICS FOR PNEUMONIA IN VIRAL DISEASES.

List of upper respirartory  diseases that can and are confused with distemper
Parainfluenza
Adenovirus
Canine influenza H3N8
influenza H1N1
Mycoplasma
Corona virus
Herpes virus
Many bacterial pneumonias.

Treatment of secondary neurologic problems in dogs remains the same at this time.  This  problem is only seen in those dogs treated late in the disease or those that make a spontaneous recovery.

If you have any comments or recommendations please write to me and we can discuss them.  I came to realize that a lot of the pneumonias that are reported are NOT distemper.  Still need to be treated.

Distemper types

1. Young un-vaccinated dogs, usually from pounds. Dogs with all the recognizable symptoms i.e. pneumonia, catarrh, fever, diarrhea, collapse, inclusions in bladder. Elevated antidistemper IgG, IgM .
2. Mild nondescript diseases shows transient signs often not recognized in early stages, quick recovery, can be confused with kennel cough. The secondary symptoms appear later. I.E. chorea, demyelination, hard pad, nasal symptoms, pneumonia, ocular symptoms K/S and old dog encephalitis.
3. New Form of Distemper. Relatively rare- adult dog fully vaccinated multiple times breaks with some symptoms of distemper, the exposure factor unknown-possible wild species exposure. May be new strain of distemper.
4. Vaccine induced type- no pneumonia, no inclusions in body, seizures, and inclusions in brain. No other pathology found upon autopsy. Elisa tests for Distemper antibody of CSF (+), No inclusions in the bladder, no inclusions in conjunctiva. Do not use Distemper / Parvo combination Vaccines. Some dogs suffer from distemper inclusion encephalitis. No treatment that I know of available. Treatment Rx For types 1-2-3. Give lcc per 10pounds plus 1 cc per animal. Three treatments every twelve hours subcutaneously for 3 total treatments. For example 20 lb dog 2 cc + 1 cc Give 3 cc each treatment.
Give antibiotics for one week to control secondary symptoms of pneumonia. I have had best results with 2 separate antibiotics simultaneously. Give fluids to control shock on initial presentation. In desperate circumstances, in the absence of available serum, NewcastlesÕs vaccine can be injected IV, directly into sick dogs. If they are not already severally compromised by the distemper virus they can respond and recover from distemper. Results Complete cessation of all symptoms of distemper in 12-48 hours. Except for secondary bacterial pneumonia which must be treated for at least 7 days.
Opinion:
It has been my observation that animals treated early do not have secondary neurologic symptoms. I would recommend all dogs suspected of distemper have full white cell count, lab work. Run antidistemper antibody IgG, IgM to confirm distemper. An additional test to confirm distemper, do a brush border slide of the bladder transitional epithelium. Stain with Dif-Quick. About 90% of the bladder cells will be positive for inclusions in the early stages of distemper. Rarely inclusions can be seen in the red cells. I have never seen inclusions in the conjunctiva. An IFA test of the conjunctiva to test for inclusions is available. I have no experience with this test. It is best to initiate all the tests and then give serum. Wait for the test results after treating. If wrong no adverse reactions if right you are ahead of the game for stopping the virus. Dogs can be treated later in the disease, after 4 to 6 days, but the serum will not undo viral damage that has already taken place. It is therefore best to treat in the early stages, or with the first acute symptoms. Dogs already showing neurologic effects of the distemper virus cannot be helped.

If anybody has any questions please feel free to contact me. AntiDistemper@aol.com

UPDATE 5/27/2010 — FIRST SERUM MADE IN PUERTO RICO.

Will these treatments save my dog from distemper?

It depends on whether your dog will be treated fast enough. Dr. Sears recommends that a dog be treated within six days of seeing symptoms. Unfortunately, many dog owners do not find out about this treatment until it is nearly too late. And often if the treatment is delayed too long other opportunistic diseases can set in. By then, even if the distemper symptoms are reversed, the dog could still die of the other diseases. In medical science there are no absolute guarantees, but if a dog is treated quickly and properly with Dr. Sears’ protocols, there is an excellent chance of recovery.

How do these treatments work?

We don’t know the full story, yet. But here’s a possible explanation: The treatments are based on the Newcastle Disease Vaccine (NDV). Newcastle Disease is something that infects chickens. The vaccine was designed to give chickens immunity from the disease, but in the dog something else entirely happens. The Newcastle Vaccine may create a response within the dog’s T-cell immune system. We think this unleashes a previously unknown class of cytokines – proteins that create an immune response – that can enter a cell infected with distemper and kill the virus. We don’t know how or why, but it works and it works quickly, often within 24 hours.

What are the symptoms of distemper?

Distemper is often seen in two stages. In the first pre-neurological stage – before neurologic problems – you may see hardening of the pads of feet, dulling of the eyes, mucous in the nose, coughing and respiratory trouble. Distemper attacks every system of the dog, so the damage is happening everywhere and there are symptoms you may not see. It can attack the stomach and make your dog vomit. For a while it may not attack the nervous system, this is because of the blood-brain barrier. However, it will eventually attack the oligodendrocytes,  which controls the production and protection of myelin. With the destruction of the myelin sheath that protects the nerves, the neurological stage begins with seizures. The neurologic problems could be seen as chorea – a kind of involuntary twitching and shuddering – as well as a loss of balance, chewing gum seizures – which look like the dog is trying to chew a piece of gum – to a full-body shaking and convulsions. Since other diseases may mimic the symptoms of distemper, your first step should be to confirm that your dog has the disease. Your vet can take a blood test for you, but by the time you get the results back the dog may be too sick to help. We recommend you get the blood tested anyway, but then treat for distemper without waiting for the results. Then later if the test does come back positive for distemper, you know you have saved your dog. But Dr. Sears has come up with a faster test called the Brush Border Smear.

So, what kind of treatment will save my dog?

That depends on how old your dog is and what kind of symptoms you are seeing. If your dog is pre-neurological, your  dog might be treated with Dr. Sears’ serum. If the dog is old enough — more than 12 weeks — and has a strong enough of an immune system, an injection of the NDV vaccine may actually be all that is needed. Some dogs recover that easily. If the animal is too young a puppy or has a compromised immune system, you will need to use the serum. If the dog is neurological, then the treatment is an injection of the NDV vaccine into the spinal canal. This allows the treatment to attack the distemper virus that is destroying the nervous system.

What is Dr Sears’ serum?

The serum is created by using a donor dog, which is injected with the NDV vaccine. The donor dog’s immune system is triggered and at a crucial time, blood is drawn from the donor. The serum is made from this blood and then can be used to save a dog in the pre-neurological stage. If used within the first six days of symptoms, the serum can stop a dog from ever having seizures.

Is the donor dog hurt?

No. When done properly in a veterinary clinic and monitored by a vet, the creation of the serum does not hurt the donor dog.

But why doesn’t every vet use this treatment?

Because this is not taught in veterinary schools, and it is not yet published in a veterinary journal. It has not yet been accepted by the veterinary community. But that doesn’t mean it is not valid. It is a new idea, a previously unknown ally in our battle against disease. And it was discovered by accident, by a simple veterinarian in a California desert community, not at a major research facility or university. In 1970, Dr. Sears tried to present his discovery to a veterinary conference in Las Vegas, but he was told to “sit down, that’s impossible.” So, he sat down and then spent years quietly saving hundreds of dogs from this disease. His work drew no attention until it was published on a Web site in 2000, and it has only been in the past couple of years since his retirement that other vets have quietly picked up his work. It will be a long road before these treatments attain publication and acceptance. Still, we have faith that this will happen eventually.

But this is so wonderful. It’s a miracle cure, isn’t it?

Whoa. Don’t get ahead of yourself. If the dog is treated within six days, there is an excellent chance of recovery. But so many people find out about these treatments late.  This is not  a resurrection technique.  It cannot save a dog who has been on the brink of death for weeks and return them to health. And with the spinal tap treatment for the neurologic distemper, you must remember that the seizures usually do not go away immediately. Sometimes it takes days, weeks, months. But what we believe has happened is that the virus has been stopped, giving the dog a chance to recover. But remember, there is always the danger of pneumonia and other diseases that can kill your dog. Also, please realize that every dog will react to this differently, just as they react to distemper differently. Factors that can affect the outcome include age, the strength of the immune system, neutering, loss of T-cell function and the genetics of the virus and of the vaccine. Even under the best of cases there will be those who do NOT respond. We aren’t promoting a miracle, but we can offer hope for distemper dogs.

What happens if I don’t get my dog treated within six days?

Then you are likely to see the neurologic phase begin. Thanks to the spinal tap treatment, there still is hope for your dog, but the odds of success start to drop. The survival rate of dogs treated with the serum within six days of symptoms is in the high 90s. After seizures have started, the survival rate of dogs treated with the NDV spinal tap is probably closer to 60 percent. The longer you wait, the more the odds of survival will drop.

And who are you?

We are Save Dogs From Canine Distemper, a project run by Kind Hearts in Action, a nonprofit based in Los Angeles to rescue and find homes for stray dogs. The project director for Save Dogs From Canine Distemper is Ed Bond, whose dog, Galen, was saved by Dr. Sears in 1997. When Galen’s story was published on the Internet in 2000, Dr. Sears finally posted the protocol for his NDV-induced serum.

How do I order the serum?

The serum cannot be mailed or shipped within the U.S., but vets can make the serum in their clinics, store it there and treat dogs brought to them.  We do not sell any veterinary product ourselves, but we do sell DVDs of Dr. Sears’ lecture last year in Houston. Proceeds from those sales are to go to help pay for the costs of making serum, treating dogs and working toward getting the serum submitted for scientific trials and publication. Kind Hearts In Action is a 501c3 charity.

How do I find a vet who can perform these treatments?

E-mail us at ed.bond.new.york@gmail.com. Tell us how old your dog is, what symptoms you are seeing, how long you have seen them and what region of the world you live. Vets using these treatments have saved dogs in central Florida, Texas, Southern California, Alberta Canada, the Philippines, India, Romania, Hungary, Turkey, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Mexico and most recently in Costa Rica. If you need a find a vet to treat your distemper dog in any of these places, please e-mail us at ed.bond.new.york@gmail.com. Also, before you panic, please get a diagnosis that you have a distemper case. The fastest way to diagnose is through the Brush Border Smear. Anyone who lives in the Philippines should also check out the blog from Clarisse Quitco-Tanner about how her dog Icy was saved: http://clarissequitco.multiply.com/photos/album/51/Icys_Canine_Distemper. ALSO: Please stay in touch with us and let us know the outcome of your case. Let us know whether your dog was given any of the NDV treatments or not. Let us know whether your dog lived, died or is still struggling with problems. We appreciate videos and pictures that show dogs before and after treatment.

What other diseases in dogs does the serum treat?

According to Dr. Sears, it has also cured dogs of herpes. It may have a beneficial effect on dogs with canine influenza. However, that depends on what strain of the virus that is attacking. However, we know for certain the serum and the NDV treatments do NOT cure parvo.

Tell me more about Dr. Sears

Dr. Al Sears was born in the Canal Zone of Panama. He went to the University of Pennsylvania and the University of California at Davis and spent 40 years practicing small animal medicine in Lancaster, Calif. He retired in 2006. More information: http://alsears.wordpress.com/

So, who is Ed Bond?

Ed Bond is the project director on canine distemper for Kind Hearts In Action, a 501c3 charity in the U.S. He also runs a group of websites on behalf of Dr. Sears. He became involved in this issue after his dog was saved from distemper by Dr. Sears in 1997. He has been an activist for this cause since December 2008, when he started the Save Dogs From Canine Distemper cause on Facebook. He now manages information about Dr. Sears and his treatments on Facebook, WordPress, Twitter and YouTube, as well as a discussion board on post-NDV spinal tap issues. However, he is not — and does not claim to be — a vet, a scientist, a researcher or an expert. He is a former journalist, using the tools of media and the Web to spread the story about Dr. Sears and his treatments, as well as documenting the outcome of as many distemper cases as possible. Ed Bond can answer many questions about the NDV treatments as Dr. Sears has explained them to him, and most of the information needed to use the treatments are on these websites, which are reviewed and approved by Dr. Sears. However, when questions become too technical, Ed will refer you directly to Dr. Sears or to another vet. More about Ed Bond.

Welcome!

If you have a dog with canine distemper, you will find here plenty of useful information about the NDV treatments discovered by Dr. Al Sears that have saved hundreds of dogs from this disease. Follow the links below to get an education about the possibilities — and the limits — of these treatments. Contact us via ed.bond.new.york@gmail.com and tell us where you are, what symptoms you are seeing and for how long.

Vets using these treatments have saved dogs in central Florida, Texas, Southern California, Alberta Canada, the Philippines, India, Romania, Hungary, Turkey, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Mexico and most recently in Costa Rica. If you need a find a vet to treat your distemper dog in any of these places, please e-mail us at ed.bond.new.york@gmail.com.

If you are a veterinarian curious about the NDV treatments, we can offer you documents, videos, owner testimonials and referrals to other vets using these treatments around the world. Our ultimate goal is to see the NDV-induced serum submitted to scientific trials.

Ed Bond

Find us on YouTube: The Kind Hearts In Action channel

Check out our latest success story

For lots of useful information on how to treat your dog suffering from canine distemper, go here:

http://www.edbond.com/distemper/